First Things First

Dear Reader, 

I hope you’ll forgive me for writing about food again. 🙂

I actually have two or three brainier posts in the pipeline, but their composition requires longer uninterrupted time of thought and Time, as you probably know first-hand, is the scarcest commodity of all nowadays. 

Do you know how powerful Time is? So powerful that even God cannot turn it back. 

So the time I’ve not been spending working or taking care of things, I’ve been spending on what underpins life – food. Unavoidable.

I've achieved a juicier bite! :) By buying 60/40 pork/beef minced meat, prepared by the butcher's, according to the Bulgarian national minced meat standard. :) The meat was too soft to shape as kebapcheta, so I made meatballs, or kyofteta, accent on the E. They tasted great, were very succulent and had no drippings at all. I baked at 250 degrees C. I've made them twice since the full-beef kebapcheta I described here. However, I am still on the quest for THE perfect home-made kebapche.
I’ve achieved a juicier bite! 🙂 By buying 60/40 pork/beef minced meat, prepared by the butcher’s, according to the Bulgarian national minced meat standard. 🙂 The meat was too soft to shape as kebapcheta, so I made meatballs, or kyofteta, accent on the E. They tasted great, were very succulent and had no drippings at all. I baked at 250 degrees C. I’ve made them twice since the full-beef kebapcheta I described here. However, I am still on the quest for THE perfect home-made kebapche.

I thought I’d share a simple omelette, that I made tonight for myself – it was rather Spartan and you can tweak it to add more fat or eggs or other ingredients, but, barebones as it was, it was great. Or perhaps I was hungry. 🙂

Another great thing - pan-baked haloumi cheese. I adore this.
Another great thing – pan-baked haloumi cheese. I adore this.

You know, since childhood I have developed the habit of reading while eating. I know it is a bad habit to have, but I love it. Now, with the intermittent fasting, I’ve found I cannot concentrate on the reading, because I am so overflowing with joy at the eating, that I want to mindfully taste every bit of taste there is. 🙂 Which, after all, is not bad – being in the moment of whatever you’re doing and not just performing the action mindlessly is part of practicing concentration and self-control.

Are you thinking what I am – that I’ve managed to turn my days into some sort of a boot-camp? 🙂 Perhaps that’s true.But I hope you are not thinking I am some stuffed shirt though! 🙂 

…Now as pleasurable as chatting with you is, let’s get down to cooking. 🙂

You’ll need: 

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  • Two eggs
  • Hard white cheese
  • Garlic cloves, green onion
  • Leafy greens – pictured are baby spinach and something which I do not know the name of. 😛 
  • Champignons/mushrooms
  • Salt, ground black pepper
  • No additional oil at all

How to prepare:

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  • Preheat the pan, add champignons and crushed garlic and dry-fry for a minute, then add boiling water. (The picture shows the champignons only, because I forgot about the garlic and added it with the greens) 🙂

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  • Reduce fire, add leafy greens and let cook under cover for a while, then crumble the cheese into the pan. 

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  • Add eggs and stir to readiness. You can of course leave them whole too, and then dip your bread into the runny egg yolks! 🙂

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Work quickly and do not overcook as eggs become rubbery when overdone.
Work quickly and do not overcook, as eggs become rubbery when overdone.
This really WAS great. At least I liked it very much.
This really WAS great.
  • Salt, if you’d like, and sprinkle with ground black pepper to serve. When ready, the leafy greens should still have some texture, don’t overcook them into a lifeless mass. 😛 
  • Complement with tarator, accent on the O – a cold yogurt-and-cucumber soup. If the seventh circle of Hell has not released a sample of its air temperatures where you live, you probably would want to skip the tarator though – it was made for hot weather. 🙂
Ingredients are yoghurt thinned with water, garlic, salt, olive oil and dill. Ground walnuts may be added too.
Ingredients are yogurt thinned with water, cucumbers, garlic, salt, olive oil and dill. Ground walnuts may be added too.
Tomato-cucumber-bulgur-and-parsley salad - a tabouleh of sorts.
Tomato-cucumber-bulgur-onion-and-parsley salad – a kind of a tabbouleh. This was actually left over from my office food and thus made it to the dinner table. 🙂

And, to feast your eyes, something which my mom has cooked – sarmi, or grape leaf wraps, with minced meat and rice. I love them, but hate making them. I may try my hand though, so as to be able to post a step-by-step recipe here. 🙂 They are very beloved by most Bulgarians. 

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I hope you enjoyed our unassuming weekday dinner.

I’m leaving you to a song I heard on the radio while driving home in the afternoon today. I was a huge fan of Bon Jovi as a teen, but had forgotten all about this rock’n’roll song for years. The lyrics, like those of most of Bon Jovi songs, are great. I was very uplifted when I heard it on the radio and actually danced on the seat and sang along. 🙂

Come on, don’t be shy, join in! 🙂