Panem et Circenses

Dear Reader,

As of Sunday night, Bulgaria has a new president.

As I have already mentioned in some other entry, geopolitical and internal affairs expertise is part of the sturdy Bulgarian DNA, alongside minor disciplines such as sports, cooking and driving.

So over the past month, we have actively debated in the cities,

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The Sofia literary cafe at the Tsar Osvoboditel Blvd., 1935. The building doesn’t stand there anymore, it was located between the Russian Church and the Military Club. The cartoon is by Alexander Bozhinov and depicts many members of the Bulgarian intelligentsia of the time.

but also in the villages. Both men

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Chudomir, Landesleute, Vion Publishers.

and women

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Chudomir, Landesleute, Vion Publishers.

have had their say.

We’ve all commented in forums, blogs, and papers. 

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Verba volant, scripta manent. Self-portrait of cartoonist and lampoonist Alexander Bozhinov in the Sofia Central Prison in 1945. Iztok-Zapad Publishing House.

People employed in all sectors of the economy, from agricultural workers

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Chudomir, Landesleute, Vion Publishers.

to members of the liberal professions,

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Chudomir, Landesleute, Vion Publishers.

thought politicians were pulling their leg, as usual.

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Self-portrait of cartoonist and lampoonist Alexander Bozhinov in the Sofia Central Prison in 1945. Iztok-Zapad Publishing House.

Trying as best as we can to sift through all the messages, we made our contribution to the generally complicated state of international affairs,

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As seen by Ilia Beshkov. Caption is “Europe in 1944. Churchill: ‘ Mr Molotoff, with a bit of an effort, I think a year should be enough…'” Iztok-Zapad Publishing House.

and now may very well be in the situation of this poor girl below, waiting for whoever would have her.

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Poland Faces a Predicament, 1944. Ilia Beshkov, Iztok-Zapad Publishing House.

Around us, things are not all that rosy either, as it is either this:

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Baby Europe in the Arms of Stalin, 1941. Ilia Beshkov, Iztok-Zapad Publishing House.

or this:

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Frau Merkel and the Clash of Civilisations. As seen in the lobby in Sofia’s satirical theatre recently.

We may have reasons to complain about many things, but being bored, lately at least, isn’t one of them.

The best things in life may indeed be free, but these days, the most thrilling ones have come from prime-time TV.

Living on bread and circuses,
Boryana

PS. Rag-time for you. Scott Joplin’s The Strenuous Life.